Student Driver

FFfPP-3-11-16

“But this is the middle of nowhere,” complained Morgan.

“That’s why it’s a great place to practice. Now, I want you to pretend this garbage can is the front of a car. Pull along side of it and parallel park.”

“Ugh, this is so stupid. Why do I have to learn this, Uncle Chris? Nobody parallel parks anymore.” Morgan pouted.

“Trust me, the skills you develop when you learn to parallel park will make you a better driver. It’s important.”

“Fine!” she sighed, throwing the car into gear.

The black Toyota slid smoothly into the imaginary parking spot in front of the imaginary car.

“Did I do it?” she asked, peering out the window.

“Great job, almost perfect.” her uncle praised. “Now, let’s do it again!”

“Oh man,” she huffed.

A month after earning her drivers license she learned that her uncle had been killed by a teenage driver who’d lost control of his car. The police chalked it up to inexperience.

Years later Morgan steered her Tesla Model S alongside a parked car.

“Why don’t you just use the self-park feature, mom?” asked Jesse.

“I like to keep my driving skills sharp,” she smiled at him. “It’s important.”

Word Count: 199

[This is my entry into the Flash Fiction Challenge for Flash Fiction for the Purposeful Practitioner by Roger Shipp. Write a story based on a photo prompt and introductory sentence in 200 words or less.

This story was inspired by an actual event, although I was not killed by a teenage driver. I promise. I wouldn’t lie about that. Probably. πŸ™‚ )

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19 thoughts on “Student Driver

  1. Ironic. The Uncle teaches his niece to drive well so she is a better driver, and he gets killed by an inexperienced young driver. Very sad. But the niece learned and knew better because of her Uncle’s death, her daughter needed to be an experienced driver. Well written. I liked this one a lot, having had my own issues driving at first. It’s awesome to have a someone who will work with you and help you practice.

    Liked by 1 person

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